There's no "me" in Growth Hacking

by Robo

A short bio about Robo

Growth hacking is a popular buzz word—attributed to the legendary entrepreneur, Sean Ellis, that denotes a single-minded focus on growth, meaning more users, more sales, more revenues, and more expansion opportunity. When this term was coined by Ellis, it was used mainly within the context of tech start-ups in desperate need of growth, so as to better understand how their product or service would truly function when paired to a viable customer base. Growth hacking relies on creative, digitally-savvy methods to grow a customer base, such as special, lucrative perks for product users who refer friends via social media. There is no “me” in growth hacking, because in order to execute a successful growth hacking strategy, the marketer (or growth hacker) must figure out where his best customers are, how to reach them, and how to retain them. A growth hacker has a singular outward focus driven by data and smart tactics (or hacks) that will quickly and efficiently net a healthy customer base.


For ecommerce businesses, the opportunities presented through growth hacking can’t be ignored. A competent growth hacker will know how to use and develop the tactics to make a product or service propagate through the web. For example, some ecommerce businesses attach special offers to purchase receipts or shipping confirmations—this tactic is sometimes referred to as “transactional marketing”—offering special incentives, coupons, giveaway, products etc. to customers who share news of their recent purchase within their social networks. Some ecommerce companies have refined a “pay through Twitter” option which discounts or covers entirely the price of goods or service when a customer plugs the company via Twitter.


In order to be a successful growth hacker, you have to remove all focus from yourself and think solely about your customers: what they want to spend their money on, what information they want to know about your products and services, and where they spend their time shopping online. Meet them where they are, and then drive them back to your ecommerce website. An example of this tactic can be found in the room rental service Airbnb, which knew that its target customers were using Craigslist to search for rooms to rent, so they built software that would scour multiple Craigslist pages and make posts that linked back to the Airbnb homepage.


In addition to learning to think like your target customers, a true growth hacker must also be capable of generating and interpreting data about her customers. Collect data about the buying habits of your customers and use this data to refine your subsequent marketing efforts. Every time you dispatch a marketing campaign of any type—email, direct mail, inbound—it should be more informed and more targeted than your last campaign. The perpetual generation and application of customer data is yet another way in which growth marketing is never about the marketer and always about the customer.

There's no "me" in Growth Hacking

There's no "me" in Growth Hacking

by Robo

A short bio about Robo

Growth hacking is a popular buzz word—attributed to the legendary entrepreneur, Sean Ellis, that denotes a single-minded focus on growth, meaning more users, more sales, more revenues, and more expansion opportunity. When this term was coined by Ellis, it was used mainly within the context of tech start-ups in desperate need of growth, so as to better understand how their product or service would truly function when paired to a viable customer base. Growth hacking relies on creative, digitally-savvy methods to grow a customer base, such as special, lucrative perks for product users who refer friends via social media. There is no “me” in growth hacking, because in order to execute a successful growth hacking strategy, the marketer (or growth hacker) must figure out where his best customers are, how to reach them, and how to retain them. A growth hacker has a singular outward focus driven by data and smart tactics (or hacks) that will quickly and efficiently net a healthy customer base.


For ecommerce businesses, the opportunities presented through growth hacking can’t be ignored. A competent growth hacker will know how to use and develop the tactics to make a product or service propagate through the web. For example, some ecommerce businesses attach special offers to purchase receipts or shipping confirmations—this tactic is sometimes referred to as “transactional marketing”—offering special incentives, coupons, giveaway, products etc. to customers who share news of their recent purchase within their social networks. Some ecommerce companies have refined a “pay through Twitter” option which discounts or covers entirely the price of goods or service when a customer plugs the company via Twitter.


In order to be a successful growth hacker, you have to remove all focus from yourself and think solely about your customers: what they want to spend their money on, what information they want to know about your products and services, and where they spend their time shopping online. Meet them where they are, and then drive them back to your ecommerce website. An example of this tactic can be found in the room rental service Airbnb, which knew that its target customers were using Craigslist to search for rooms to rent, so they built software that would scour multiple Craigslist pages and make posts that linked back to the Airbnb homepage.


In addition to learning to think like your target customers, a true growth hacker must also be capable of generating and interpreting data about her customers. Collect data about the buying habits of your customers and use this data to refine your subsequent marketing efforts. Every time you dispatch a marketing campaign of any type—email, direct mail, inbound—it should be more informed and more targeted than your last campaign. The perpetual generation and application of customer data is yet another way in which growth marketing is never about the marketer and always about the customer.